Saturday, 18 March 2017

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet

Often I end up dealing with code that works but might not be of the highest quality. While quality is subjective I like to use the idea of "code smell" to convey what I mean, these are a list of indicators that, in total, help to identify code that might benefit from some improvement.

Such smells may include:
  • Complex code lacking comments on intended operation
  • Code lacking API documentation comments especially for interfaces used outside the local module
  • Not following style guide
  • Inconsistent style
  • Inconsistent indentation
  • Poorly structured code
  • Overly long functions
  • Excessive use of pre-processor
  • Many nested loops and control flow clauses
  • Excessive numbers of parameters
I am most certainly not alone in using this approach and Fowler et al have covered this subject in the literature much better than I can here. One point I will raise though is some programmers dismiss code that exhibits these traits as "legacy" and immediately suggest a fresh implementation. There are varying opinions on when a rewrite is the appropriate solution from never to always but in my experience making the old working code smell nice is almost always less effort and risk than a re-write.

Tests

When I come across smelly code, and I decide it is worthwhile improving it, I often discover the biggest smell is lack of test coverage. Now do remember this is just one code smell and on its own might not be indicative, my experience is smelly code seldom has effective test coverage while fresh code often does.

Test coverage is generally understood to be the percentage of source code lines and decision paths used when instrumented code is exercised by a set of tests. Like many metrics developer tools produce, "coverage percentage" is often misused by managers as a proxy for code quality. Both Fowler and Marick have written about this but sufficient to say that for a developer test coverage is a useful tool but should not be misapplied.

Although refactoring without tests is possible the chances for unintended consequences are proportionally higher. I often approach such a refactor by enumerating all the callers and constructing a description of the used interface beforehand and check that that interface is not broken by the refactor. At which point is is probably worth writing a unit test to automate the checks.

Because of this I have changed my approach to such refactoring to start by ensuring there is at least basic API code coverage. This may not yield the fashionable 85% coverage target but is useful and may be extended later if desired.

It is widely known and equally widely ignored that for maximum effectiveness unit tests must be run frequently and developers take action to rectify failures promptly. A test that is not being run or acted upon is a waste of resources both to implement and maintain which might be better spent elsewhere.

For projects I contribute to frequently I try to ensure that the CI system is running the coverage target, and hence the unit tests, which automatically ensures any test breaking changes will be highlighted promptly. I believe the slight extra overhead of executing the instrumented tests is repaid by having the coverage metrics available to the developers to aid in spotting areas with inadequate tests.

Example

A short example will help illustrate my point. When a web browser receives an object over HTTP the server can supply a MIME type in a content-type header that helps the browser interpret the resource. However this meta-data is often problematic (sorry that should read "a misleading lie") so the actual content must be examined to get a better answer for the user. This is known as mime sniffing and of course there is a living specification.

The source code that provides this API (Linked to it rather than included for brevity) has a few smells:
  • Very few comments of any type
  • The API are not all well documented in its header
  • A lot of global context
  • Local static strings which should be in the global string table
  • Pre-processor use
  • Several long functions
  • Exposed API has many parameters
  • Exposed API uses complex objects
  • The git log shows the code has not been significantly updated since its implementation in 2011 but the spec has.
  • No test coverage
While some of these are obvious the non-use of the global string table and the API complexity needed detailed knowledge of the codebase, just to highlight how subjective the sniff test can be. There is also one huge air freshener in all of this which definitely comes from experience and that is the modules author. Their name at the top of this would ordinarily be cause for me to move on, but I needed an example!

First thing to check is the API use

$ git grep -i -e mimesniff_compute_effective_type --or -e mimesniff_init --or -e mimesniff_fini
content/hlcache.c:              error = mimesniff_compute_effective_type(handle, NULL, 0,
content/hlcache.c:              error = mimesniff_compute_effective_type(handle,
content/hlcache.c:              error = mimesniff_compute_effective_type(handle,
content/mimesniff.c:nserror mimesniff_init(void)
content/mimesniff.c:void mimesniff_fini(void)
content/mimesniff.c:nserror mimesniff_compute_effective_type(llcache_handle *handle,
content/mimesniff.h:nserror mimesniff_compute_effective_type(struct llcache_handle *handle,
content/mimesniff.h:nserror mimesniff_init(void);
content/mimesniff.h:void mimesniff_fini(void);
desktop/netsurf.c:      ret = mimesniff_init();
desktop/netsurf.c:      mimesniff_fini();

This immediately shows me that this API is used in only a very small area, this is often not the case but the general approach still applies.

After a little investigation the usage is effectively that the mimesniff_init API must be called before the mimesniff_compute_effective_type API and the mimesniff_fini releases the initialised resources.

A simple test case was added to cover the API, this exercised the behaviour both when the init was called before the computation and not. Also some simple tests for a limited number of well behaved inputs.

By changing to using the global string table the initialisation and finalisation API can be removed altogether along with a large amount of global context and pre-processor macros. This single change removes a lot of smell from the module and raises test coverage both because the global string table already has good coverage and because there are now many fewer lines and conditionals to check in the mimesniff module.

I stopped the refactor at this point but were this more than an example I probably would have:
  • made the compute_effective_type interface simpler with fewer, simpler parameters
  • ensured a solid set of test inputs
  • examined using a fuzzer to get a better test corpus.
  • added documentation comments
  • updated the implementation to 2017 specification.

Conclusion

The approach examined here reduce the smell of code in an incremental, testable way to improve the codebase going forward. This is mainly necessary on larger complex codebases where technical debt and bit-rot are real issues that can quickly overwhelm a codebase if not kept in check.

This technique is subjective but helps a programmer to quantify and examine a piece of code in a structured fashion. However it is only a tool and should not be over applied nor used as a metric to proxy for code quality.

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